Saturday, April 19, 2014
cum5lut:

Seiichi Hayashi

cum5lut:

Seiichi Hayashi

(Source: slutevrrr)

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

During the summer of 2013, Xiu Xiu frontman Jamie Stewart and producer Shahzad Ismaily traveled to Sigur Rós’s personal studio in Iceland. Having access to the space for only one day, Stewart worked on setting down his interpretations of American and Caribbean spirituals using a 1953 Silvertone guitar given to him by his father (producer Michael Stewart), the man who introduced him to religious thought and folk music.

The resulting album, Unclouded Sky, explores themes of death and faith over the course of nine songs originally composed between 1850 and 1920, which are interspersed with field recordings Stewart made in the jungle of Guyana.

Unclouded Sky will be available on vinyl as part of Record Store Day 2014.

Monday, April 7, 2014

vogdoid:

fer1972: ”Soundsuits” Series by Nick Cave

theevildead-:

Michael
exhaustedscreen:

'The Moscow writer Andrei Sinyavsky wrote letters to his wife while he was imprisoned in Siberia from 1965 to 1972. Quoted in Finnish documentarist Kanerva Cederstrom's Trans-Siberia: Notes from the camps (1999), Sinyavsky wrote that being in prison - with a definite ending date - is like being on a train. You have nothing to do but wait for the end, so you have a remarkable freedom, and time takes on many different characters: it seems to stand still, it speeds along. He writes, “Time seems to be either nearer or further off than you had expected… It slows down at times, then picks up again, past itself. It is both too big and too small for what it used to be.” Watching a film is like this, too: there’s an implicit contract that you’ll spend a certain period of time, and so within that period you are free; time expands and contracts around you according to how you attend to the film.’
- Laura U. Marks, ‘Immersed in the Single Channel: Experimental Media from Theatre to Gallery’, Millennium Film Journal 55 (Spring 2012), p.19.

exhaustedscreen:

'The Moscow writer Andrei Sinyavsky wrote letters to his wife while he was imprisoned in Siberia from 1965 to 1972. Quoted in Finnish documentarist Kanerva Cederstrom's Trans-Siberia: Notes from the camps (1999), Sinyavsky wrote that being in prison - with a definite ending date - is like being on a train. You have nothing to do but wait for the end, so you have a remarkable freedom, and time takes on many different characters: it seems to stand still, it speeds along. He writes, “Time seems to be either nearer or further off than you had expected… It slows down at times, then picks up again, past itself. It is both too big and too small for what it used to be.” Watching a film is like this, too: there’s an implicit contract that you’ll spend a certain period of time, and so within that period you are free; time expands and contracts around you according to how you attend to the film.’

- Laura U. Marks, ‘Immersed in the Single Channel: Experimental Media from Theatre to Gallery’, Millennium Film Journal 55 (Spring 2012), p.19.

Wednesday, April 2, 2014
funeral-wreaths:

William Blake, The Ghost of a Flea, c. 1819-20

The subject of The Ghost of a Flea arose from a series of bizarre drawings of so-called ‘visionary heads’, created by William Blake in 1819. During nightly meetings his friend, the artist and amateur astrologist John Varley, urged Blake to draw the many historical and ethereal figures which populated his visions. Absorbed in a trancelike state, Blake filled two sketchbooks and a possible third with sketches of the visionary heads of Merlin, Robin Hood, Alexander the Great, John Milton and his daughters, Charlemagne and ‘the man who built the Pyramids’, among many others. Among the more grotesque drawings was that of the monstrous ghost of a flea, a spirit which apparently explained to Blake that fleas are inhabited by the souls of bloodthirsty men. Blake later developed the drawing into this painting, portraying the flea-ghost as a heavily-muscled behemoth striding across what might be a visionary landscape, or, as suggested by the swaying curtains and what appear to be floorboards, a theatre stage. The flea carries a chalice, apparently to collect the human blood it thirsts for with its darting tongue. {More information on Blake’s ‘Visionary Heads’} {Alan Moore discusses the painting}

funeral-wreaths:

William Blake, The Ghost of a Flea, c. 1819-20

The subject of The Ghost of a Flea arose from a series of bizarre drawings of so-called ‘visionary heads’, created by William Blake in 1819. During nightly meetings his friend, the artist and amateur astrologist John Varley, urged Blake to draw the many historical and ethereal figures which populated his visions. Absorbed in a trancelike state, Blake filled two sketchbooks and a possible third with sketches of the visionary heads of Merlin, Robin Hood, Alexander the Great, John Milton and his daughters, Charlemagne and ‘the man who built the Pyramids’, among many others. Among the more grotesque drawings was that of the monstrous ghost of a flea, a spirit which apparently explained to Blake that fleas are inhabited by the souls of bloodthirsty men. Blake later developed the drawing into this painting, portraying the flea-ghost as a heavily-muscled behemoth striding across what might be a visionary landscape, or, as suggested by the swaying curtains and what appear to be floorboards, a theatre stage. The flea carries a chalice, apparently to collect the human blood it thirsts for with its darting tongue. {More information on Blake’s ‘Visionary Heads’} {Alan Moore discusses the painting}

ANA TERESA FERNANDEZ - FOREIGN BODIES
Gallery Wendy Norris

APRIL 3 - MAY 31, 2014
Fernandez’ first solo exhibition, Foreign Bodies, at Gallery Wendi Norris explores how women navigate the geographic, social, and physiological boundaries between the United States and Mexico. Documenting her performances and installations using photography and the painted image, Fernández’s work reveals how women’s bodies become surfaces imprinted with political and social upheavals.

ANA TERESA FERNANDEZ - FOREIGN BODIES

Gallery Wendy Norris

APRIL 3 - MAY 31, 2014

Fernandez’ first solo exhibition, Foreign Bodies, at Gallery Wendi Norris explores how women navigate the geographic, social, and physiological boundaries between the United States and Mexico. Documenting her performances and installations using photography and the painted image, Fernández’s work reveals how women’s bodies become surfaces imprinted with political and social upheavals.

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
kkoktutheatre:

Himalayan bus.

kkoktutheatre:

Himalayan bus.

the artist expresses … intimate fantasizing … by wrapping it up in a socially acceptable form—by … offering the pleasure of the beautiful artistic form as a lure which seduces us into accepting the otherwise repulsive excessive pleasure of intimate fantasizing Slavoj Zizek (via alterities)
Saturday, March 1, 2014
Friday, February 28, 2014

Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten: Cambodia’s Lost Rock n Roll

"If you want to eliminate the values from past societies, you have to eliminate the artists"

Wednesday, February 26, 2014
warrenellis:

From Rod Serling’s Wikipedia entry

warrenellis:

From Rod Serling’s Wikipedia entry