Tuesday, July 22, 2014
The effect of the cultural bomb is to annihilate a people’s belief in their names, in their languages, in their environment, in their heritage of struggle, in their unity, in their capacities and ultimately in themselves. It makes them see their past as one wasteland of non-achievement and it makes them want to distance themselves from that wasteland. It makes them want to identify with that which is furthest removed from themselves; for instance, with other peoples’ languages rather than their own. It makes them identify with that which is decadent and reactionary, all those forces that would stop their own springs of life. It even plants serious doubts about the moral righteousness of struggle. Possibilities of triumph or victory are seen as remote, ridiculous dreams. The intended results are despair, despondency and a collective death-wish. Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Decolonising the Mind (via daughterofzami)
Sunday, July 20, 2014

jacobwren:

"In the radio interview, Henry Flynt tells a story in which he and Tony Conrad first hear a recording of Ali Akbar Khan. The two of them spin a theory in which this recording of the great Indian musician was actually cooked up in the off-hours by members of the New York Philharmonic in someone’s basement in Brooklyn. This speaks to one of the mysteries of sound recording - and one that seems to have appealed to Flynt - namely, that a dearth of information surrounding the circumstances of a recording can allow the imagination to jump to the fore."
- David Grubbs, Records Ruin the Landscape

(Source: youtube.com)

luz-natural:

Pure lack 

luz-natural:

Pure lack 

(Source: anikotakacs)

A one pager, not too much thought went into it. I need to dive deeper into the concept of storytelling and truths. In the meantime, got to start somewhere. Why not with occasional one pagers?
#kkoktu #kara y frame

A one pager, not too much thought went into it. I need to dive deeper into the concept of storytelling and truths. In the meantime, got to start somewhere. Why not with occasional one pagers?

#kkoktu #kara y frame

Friday, July 18, 2014

“Listen to me. I know something else. It will begin again. 200,000 dead and 80,000 wounded in nine seconds. Those are the official figures. It will begin again. It will be 10,000 degrees on the earth. Ten thousand suns, people will say. The asphalt will burn. Chaos will prevail. An entire city will be lifted off the ground, and fall back to earth in ashes…I meet you. I remember you. Who are you? You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. How could I know this city was tailor-made for love? How could I know you fit my body like a glove? I like you. How unlikely. I like you. How slow all of a sudden. How sweet. You cannot know. You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. I have time. Please, devour me. Deform me to the point of ugliness. Why not you?”

aleskot:

image

Monday, July 7, 2014
magictransistor:

Shambhala Mandala. The Magic Kingdom. 1700s.
Shambhala or “bde ‘byung” in Tibetan, means “The source of happiness”. The Kingdom of Shambhala takes a central place in the Kalachakra teachings. Not only did the historical Shakyamuni Buddha teach the Kalachakra tantra at the request of King Suchandra of Shambhala, also the teachings are said to be preserved there. It is predicted that a few centuries from now, a spiritual revival of the world will come from Shambhala.
As can be seen on the image above, Shambhala is usually depicted as circular. Divided like a Dharma-Wheel, it spreads out between high mountains and contains many cities. In the center of the hub is the capital Kalapa. Several people, including the ones who brought the Kalachakra teachings into our world, are said to have traveled there, or have had visions of it. One of the visionaries alive these days is Khamtrul Rinpoche.
As His Holiness the Dalai Lama noted during the 1985 Kalachakra initiation in Bodhgaya, Shambhala is not an ordinary country: ”Although those with special affiliation may actually be able to go there through their karmic connection, nevertheless it is not a physical place that we can actually find. We can only say that it is a pure land, a pure land in the human realm. And unless one has the merit and the actual karmic association, one cannot actually arrive there.”

magictransistor:

Shambhala Mandala. The Magic Kingdom. 1700s.

Shambhala or “bde ‘byung” in Tibetan, means “The source of happiness”. The Kingdom of Shambhala takes a central place in the Kalachakra teachings. Not only did the historical Shakyamuni Buddha teach the Kalachakra tantra at the request of King Suchandra of Shambhala, also the teachings are said to be preserved there. It is predicted that a few centuries from now, a spiritual revival of the world will come from Shambhala.

As can be seen on the image above, Shambhala is usually depicted as circular. Divided like a Dharma-Wheel, it spreads out between high mountains and contains many cities. In the center of the hub is the capital Kalapa. Several people, including the ones who brought the Kalachakra teachings into our world, are said to have traveled there, or have had visions of it. One of the visionaries alive these days is Khamtrul Rinpoche.

As His Holiness the Dalai Lama noted during the 1985 Kalachakra initiation in Bodhgaya, Shambhala is not an ordinary country: ”Although those with special affiliation may actually be able to go there through their karmic connection, nevertheless it is not a physical place that we can actually find. We can only say that it is a pure land, a pure land in the human realm. And unless one has the merit and the actual karmic association, one cannot actually arrive there.”

ritual-specialists:

"The Korean shaman (mudang) Lee, Hae-Kyeong is one of those modern pioneers. On the one hand, she is an active shaman, that promotes her shamanic activity in a multimedia way but on the other hand she is very conservative about the performance or form of her rituals. In her rituals (gut) she maintains the strict, traditional sequences of the Hwanghaedo Tradition (North Korean tradition).
This shaman tradition originates in the North Korean province Hwanghaedo. (Due to the Korean War (1950-1953), the shamans of the region were forced to flee to South Korea. Today, those rituals of the Hwanghaedo tradition are mainly observed in Incheon and/or Seoul.)”
Photo and text by Dirk Schlottmann

Interesting site. While I see a lot online about pagan ritualism, I suddenly remembered that as one with some Korean heritage a strong mostly female lead shamanism still resides in Korea. A branch of rituals that stretches from Siberia to Japan. It’s strange sometimes for me to hear of my mother tell me she was “protestant” without having a clue of what that meant or that my east asian relatives talked of spirits and ghosts, when I think the truth was far more that the journey from North Korea to Seoul during the time of Japanese occupation, the Korean War and subsequent dictatorships, surviving became the utmost truth. Of course, what I know of these lineages now resides as a frozen memory passed through the silence of an oral tradition doubling as the lived experience.

ritual-specialists:

"The Korean shaman (mudang) Lee, Hae-Kyeong is one of those modern pioneers. On the one hand, she is an active shaman, that promotes her shamanic activity in a multimedia way but on the other hand she is very conservative about the performance or form of her rituals. In her rituals (gut) she maintains the strict, traditional sequences of the Hwanghaedo Tradition (North Korean tradition).

This shaman tradition originates in the North Korean province Hwanghaedo. (Due to the Korean War (1950-1953), the shamans of the region were forced to flee to South Korea. Today, those rituals of the Hwanghaedo tradition are mainly observed in Incheon and/or Seoul.)”

Photo and text by Dirk Schlottmann

Interesting site. While I see a lot online about pagan ritualism, I suddenly remembered that as one with some Korean heritage a strong mostly female lead shamanism still resides in Korea. A branch of rituals that stretches from Siberia to Japan. It’s strange sometimes for me to hear of my mother tell me she was “protestant” without having a clue of what that meant or that my east asian relatives talked of spirits and ghosts, when I think the truth was far more that the journey from North Korea to Seoul during the time of Japanese occupation, the Korean War and subsequent dictatorships, surviving became the utmost truth. Of course, what I know of these lineages now resides as a frozen memory passed through the silence of an oral tradition doubling as the lived experience.

Friday, July 4, 2014
You guys know about vampires? … You know, vampires have no reflections in a mirror? There’s this idea that monsters don’t have reflections in a mirror. And what I’ve always thought isn’t that monsters don’t have reflections in a mirror. It’s that if you want to make a human being into a monster, deny them, at the cultural level, any reflection of themselves. And growing up, I felt like a monster in some ways. I didn’t see myself reflected at all. Junot Díaz on race and representation in media (via medievalpoc)

alisonsampsonart:

Here’s tomorrow’s cover for the UK’s Guardian, with my illustration for Zadie Smith’s write up of JG Ballard’s Crash. It’s cool how abstract it has come out- fighting a lot of text, it needed that. I was delighted to be asked to do this- Ballard is very much up my street design and story-wise. If anyone out there wants to adapt some of his work to comics (or publish an adaptation), I am here.

Holy shit, Zadie Smith did a write up on JG Ballards crash??!? I want to read that. Hopefully this get down online.